Tooth Removal (Tooth Extraction)

1 Aralık 2020by dentislife
Having a tooth  pulled in adulthood is sometimes necessary.

Reasons for Pulling Teeth

Although permanent teeth were meant to last a lifetime, there are a number of reasons why tooth extraction  may be needed. A very common reason involves a tooth that is too badly damaged, from trauma or decay, to be repaired. Other reasons include:

A crowded mouth. Sometimes dentists pull teeth to prepare the mouth for orthodontia. The goal of orthodontia is to properly align the teeth, which may not be possible if your teeth are too big for your mouth. Likewise, if a tooth cannot break through the gum (erupt) because there is not room in the mouth for it, your dentist may recommend pulling it.

Infection. If tooth decay or damage extends to the pulp — the center of the tooth containing nerves and blood vessels — bacteria in the mouth can enter the pulp, leading to infection. Often this can be corrected with root canal therapy (RCT), but if the infection is so severe that antibiotics  or RCT do not cure it, extraction may be needed to prevent the spread of infection.

Risk of infection. If your immune system is compromised (for example, if you are receiving chemotherapy or are having an organ transplant, even the risk of infection in a particular tooth may be reason enough to pull the tooth.

Periodontal (gum) disease. If peridontal disease — an infection of the tissues and bones that surround and support the teeth — have caused loosening of the teeth, it may be necessary to pull the tooth or teeth.

Preparing for tooth removal

Your dentist will explain how to prepare for your procedure. They’ll ask about your dental and medical history. It’s important to let them know about any medical conditions, allergies or recent surgery, as well as any medicines you’re taking.

Your dentist will discuss with you what will happen before, including any pain you might have. If you’re unsure about anything, ask. No question is too small. Being fully informed will help you feel more at ease and will allow you to give your consent for the procedure to go ahead.

Anaesthesia for tooth removal

You’ll usually have your tooth (or teeth) removed under a local anaesthetic. This completely blocks pain from your gums, although you’ll still feel pressure. You’ll stay awake during the procedure, so you’ll be aware of what’s happening. If you’re very anxious about having your tooth removed, it might be possible to have a sedative, which relieves anxiety, makes you feel sleepy and helps you to relax.

Having a general anaesthetic for an extraction is usually only an option for young children or adults with learning disabilities. However, your dentist may decide it’s right for you if several of your teeth need to be removed, or the extraction is going to be more difficult than usual.

If you’re going to have a general anaesthetic, your dentist will refer you to a hospital to have your procedure.

The procedure: tooth removal

Once you’re sitting comfortably in a chair, your dentist will inject a local anaesthetic into the area around your tooth or teeth. They’ll wait a few minutes to allow the injection to work and ask you a few questions to see if it’s taking effect.

The roots of your tooth sit in a socket (hole) in your gum. Your dentist will widen your tooth socket and gently loosen your tooth before they remove it. Sometimes your dentist may need to put a stitch in the empty socket to help it heal.

You’ll feel some pressure in your mouth when you have a tooth removed but it shouldn’t be painful. If you do feel any pain, let your dentist know straightaway.

If you have any questions or concerns, please contact your dentist, or speak to your Dentislife specialist

Recovering from tooth removalMost people can go back to their normal routine the same day. Only if you have a more difficult surgical extraction, will it take a few days to recover. See how you feel and follow your dentist’s advice.

If you had a local anaesthetic, it may take a few hours before the feeling comes back into your mouth. Don’t have any hot food or drinks until it comes back otherwise you might burn or scald your mouth. Also take care not to bite your tongue, particularly when you speak, drink or eat. Rest as much as possible and keep your head up to reduce the bleeding.

Your mouth may feel sore once the anaesthetic wears off. If you need pain relief, you can take over-the-counter painkillers such as paracetamol or ibuprofen. Your dentist may suggest that you take paracetamol and ibuprofen together. Always read the patient information leaflet that comes with your medicines. If you have any questions, ask a pharmacist for advice.

Some people find that their pain is worse about three days after the procedure, but then settles down again within a week to 10 days. This is completely normal. If you’re in severe pain and it gets worse, contact your dentist. They’ll check that nothing else is causing it, such as an infection.

Side-effects of tooth removal

After your tooth is removed, you may have some side-effects, which shouldn’t last long.

You’re likely to have some discomfort for a few days afterwards and you may have some swelling. You can use an ice pack or frozen peas wrapped in a towel to reduce the swelling. Your discomfort should settle down completely within about 10 days. You might have some bruising for a couple of weeks and your jaw may feel a little stiff for a week. Don’t force your jaw open if it’s stiff.

You might notice some bleeding for a day or two. The blood will be mixed with your saliva, which can make it look like there’s more blood than there actually is. But if the bleeding doesn’t stop, contact Dentistlife practice

Complications of tooth removal

Complications are when problems occur during or after a procedure. Complications of having a tooth removed include:

  • Damage to other teeth. This might happen when your dentist removes your tooth, particularly if the teeth next to the one being removed have a large filling or crown.
  • Sensitive teeth. The teeth next to the one that’s removed may feel sensitive and this may last several weeks.
  • Poor healing. If the blood doesn’t clot in your tooth socket, it won’t heal properly. This is called dry socket and can be very painful. You’re more likely to develop dry socket if you smoke or take oral contraceptives. See your dentist straightaway. They’ll put a dressing in the socket and prescribe you some antibiotics.
  • A nerve injury. You might get a tingling or pins and needles or a numb feeling in your gum near the tooth socket. This may be caused if your nerves are bruised in the procedure, but it won’t usually last long.

 

If you think you may have complications from a tooth extraction, seek advice from us or contact Dentislife specialist

 

DentisLife

Aklınıza takılan her konuda bizlere aşağıda yer alan iletişim bilgilerinden ulaşabilirsiniz, sağlıklı günler dileriz.

Sosyal Bağlantılar

Bu sosyal bağlantılarda Dentislife’ı ziyaret edin ve bizimle bağlantı kurun. Gelişmerlerden haberdar olmak için hesaplarımızı takip edebilirsiniz.

Copyright 2020 Arkap.org. Tüm Hakları Saklıdır.

Copyright 2020 Arkap.org. Tüm Hakları Saklıdır.

Ara